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speaker icon Homilies 2016 (page 1)
Advent 2015 onwards - liturgical Year C - Luke
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Homilies section index

2012-13 - previous year C

Advent 2014 to Feb 2015

  Lent 2015 to Corpus Christi

external resource links are below

Year from Advent 2015 onwards. Other homilies not uploaded here may be available on request contact or feedback
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 Sunday 24th January 2016 - Third week in ord time - Year C
readings: Nehemiah 82-6,8-10 & 1 Corinthians 12:12-30 Gospel: Luke 1:1-4,4:14-21 "This text is being fulfilled today" with Homily by Fr. Philip Dyson - 11am Mass (13:10 mins) >>

[ torch.op.org - Dominican Friars: homily for today ]

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 Read Bishop Mark's Homily at Hayle Churches Together service for close of Christian Unity week 24th Jan '16

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 Saturday 30th January 2016 - Fourth week in ord time - Year C
readings: Jeremiah 1:4-5,17-19 & 1 Corintians 12:31-13:13 Gospel: Luke 4:21-30 "Like Elijah and Elisha, Jesus is not sent to the Jews only"
with Homily by Fr. Philip Dyson - 5pm Vigil Mass (13:12 mins) >>

[ torch.op.org - Dominican Friars: homily for today ]

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Reflection January 2016: Last week was the annual "Week of Prayer for Christian Unity." The theme this year has been "Salt of the Earth." In this Sunday's Mass readings, we find St Paul writing to the Corinthians about being members of the Body of Christ. These two themes are linked and this link is very neatly made in the 'Catechism of the Catholic Church,' giving us a useful Reflection for the week ahead:
'Characteristics of the People of God. 782 The People of God is marked by characteristics that clearly distinguish it from all other religious, ethnic, political, or cultural groups found in history: - It is the People of God: God is not the property of any one people. But he acquired a people for himself from those who previously were not a people: "a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation."
- One becomes a member of this people not by a physical birth, but by being "born anew," a birth "of water and the Spirit," that is, by faith in Christ, and Baptism. - This People has for its Head Jesus the Christ (the anointed, the Messiah). Because the same anointing, the Holy Spirit, flows from the head into the body, this is "the messianic people."
- "The status of this people is that of the dignity and freedom of the sons of God, in whose hearts the Holy Spirit dwells as in a temple."
- "Its law is the new commandment to love as Christ loved us." This is the "new" law of the Holy Spirit.
- Its mission is to be salt of the earth and light of the world. This people is "a most sure seed of unity, hope, and salvation for the whole human race."
- Its destiny, finally, "is the Kingdom of God which has been begun by God himself on earth and which must be further extended until it has been brought to perfection by him at the end of time." ' ~ Fr John Gilbert (Helston & Falmouth parish)

 Sunday 7th February 2016 - Fifth week ord time - Year C
listen to readings: Isaiah 6:1-2,3-8 & 1 Corinthians 15:1-11 Gospel: Luke 5:1-11 "They left everything and followed Him"
with Homily by Fr. Philip Dyson - 11am Mass (12:06 mins) >>

[ torch.op.org - Dominican Friars: homily for today ]

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Jesus was led by the Spirit through the wilderness and was tempted there. Each First Sunday of Lent, the Gospel tells of Jesus’ temptation in the wilderness; as we begin the journey of Lent during which we will consider our lives as members of the Church, we look to the example of Jesus when it comes to dealing with temptation. Choosing to follow God's path is the first characteristic of the Christian: this is underlined in the two other readings, which outline the two" creeds" or statements of belief - one of Israel and one of the Christian. Both of them emphasise "believing in the heart and confessing with the lips": both creeds underline the Salvation that God has achieved – for Israel it was freedom from Egypt, for the Christian freedom from death in Jesus. >>

 Sunday 14th February 2016 - First week in Lent - Year C
readings: Deuteronomy 26:4-10 & Romans 10:8-13 Gospel: Luke 4:1-13 "Jesus was led by the Spirit through the wilderness and was tempted there"
with Homily by Fr. Philip Dyson - 11am Mass (11:36 mins) >>

[ torch.op.org - Dominican Friars: homily for today ]

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Homily by Fr. John Gilbert (visiting from Falmouth & Helston) on Saturday 13th. Vigil Mass 5pm (11:36 mins - 3.98MB MP3) >>

click to download / open 

"As Jesus prayed, the aspect of his face was changed." Each Second Sunday of Lent, we hear about the Transfiguration of Jesus on the mountain top. Why? Jesus revealed his glory to the three apostles in order to strengthen them for the journey ahead - the journey to Jerusalem, Gethsemane and Golgotha. The same vision is today offered to us, to strengthen us in our Lenten Journey of Faith. Last week we heard about temptation: this week we are driven onwards by a vision of glory that will be ours - the goal of our lives of faith and all that we do as Christians. The transfiguration represents the final destination of our lives, if we are faithful in resisting temptation and living each day as faithful members of Jesus Christ. In our journey of renewal and new commitment through Lent, we are spurred on and encouraged by today's vision to see why the effort is worth it. >>

 Sunday 21st February 2016 - Second week in Lent - Year C
readings: Genesis 15:5-12,17-18& Philippians 3:17-4:1 Gospel: Luke 9:28-36 "As Jesus prayed, the aspect of His face was changed."
with Homily by Fr. Philip Dyson - 11am Mass (11:02 mins) >>

[ torch.op.org - Dominican Friars: homily for today ]

######### use player or click >play button (yahoo player) or click to download / open [or right click, 'save as' / 'save target' to listen offline] (3.79MB MP3)

In this Sunday's Gospel three apostles see our Lord transfigured in glory. They are delighted; and who wouldn't be? They've caught a glimpse of who and what their Master really is. "It's wonderful," they murmur, "just wonderful to be here. Let's stay here; let it always be like this. Let the good times last." But the next time they were to see their Master transfigured, how different the circumstances would be! They were to see him lying prostrate in the Garden of Gethsemane, his body bathed in sweat, praying in desperation to his Father. How hard then for them to believe that this was indeed the only Son of God, the well-beloved One. But, with a little patience, just a few more days, and that same Jesus, now ablaze with risen glory, would be standing before them; and on that Easter Sunday morning they were to realise that all their doubts were unfounded. God was to prove his love for his Son in a way they could never have imagined – not by saving him from suffering and death, but rather by enabling him to conquer them and finally by raising him up from death itself. When we're given assurances of God's love for us, and experience that love in worshipping and praising him, that's like being with the apostles on the Mount of Transfiguration. When we meet with tragedy, when we feel driven almost to the point of despair, finding it hard to believe that God does still care for us – that's like being with the apostles in the garden of Gethsemane. Yet if we keep on trusting in him, keep on having patience with him, even when he appears to have forgotten us, then for us, as for the apostles, there will be an Easter Sunday. Meanwhile, it is our task as present-day followers of Jesus to do everything in our power (by word and by example) to convince people that God loves them. ~ Fr John Gilbert (Helston & Falmouth parish)

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 Sunday 28th February 2016 - Third week in Lent - Year C
readings: Exodus 3:1-8,13-15 7 1 Corinthians 10:1-6,10-12 Gospel: Luke 13:1-9 "Unless you repent you will all perish as they did."
with Homily by Fr. Philip Dyson - 11am Mass (9:35 mins) >>

[ torch.op.org - Dominican Friars: homily for today ]

######### use player or click >play button (yahoo player) or click to download / open [or right click, 'save as' / 'save target' to listen offline] (3.29MB MP3)

In this Sunday's Gospel reading Jesus emphasises the importance of repentance in spiritual life and uses the parable of the barren fig tree to illustrate the conditions necessary for growth. The vineyard keeper wanted to give the fig tree one more season in which to bear fruit. He was prepared to nurture it in the hope that it would become fruitful. If the Christian life is to bear fruit, it, too, must be nourished. Growth is not an easy process. It is often painful and wearisome. We remember, too, that the fig tree could not grow by itself - it needed light, moisture and nourishment, in addition to the guiding hand of the vineyard keeper. As members of the Church, we depend on the light and nourishment of the word of God and the sacraments in order to grow. We also need the guidance and support of our fellow Christians. If any of these elements is taken away, then growth will be impaired and we will not thrive as we should. As we acknowledge the need to grow, we become aware of our calling to encourage our fellow Christians to grow in faith and love as well. We are responsible not only for our own personal growth, but also for the growth of others. The Christian is challenged to grow through the difficult times in life. None of us can avoid difficulty and pain, and many will testify that they have in fact grown most effectively during such times, although often it is only with hindsight that they can perceive such growth. At times of pain and crisis there seems to be only brokenness; but don't despair when you come to such a time! It is the nature of God to bring order and wholeness out of chaos - that, after all, is what Resurrection is all about. God can, and does, turn all things to good. We help others to grow by listening and being supportive, especially during difficult times. We also help ourselves to grow by being open to receiving the support and encouragement of others. ~ Fr John Gilbert (Helston & Falmouth parish)

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 Saturday 5th March 2016 - Fourth week in Lent - Year C
readings: Joshua 5:9-12 & 2 Corinthians 5:17-21 Gospel: Luke 15:1-3,11-3 "Your brother here was dead and has come to life."
with Homily by Fr. Philip Dyson -  5pm Vigil Mass (12:38 mins) >>

[ torch.op.org - Dominican Friars: homily for today ]

######### use player or click >play button (yahoo player) or click to download / open [or right click, 'save as' / 'save target' to listen offline] (4.34MB MP3)

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Sunday 13th March 2016 - Fifth week in Lent - Year C
readings: Isaiah 43:16-21 & Philippians 3:8-14 Gospel: John 8:1-11 "If there is one of you who has not sinned, let him be the first to throw a stone at her." with Homily by Fr. Philip Dyson - 11am Mass (14:22 mins incomplete recording) >>

[ torch.op.org - Dominican Friars: homily for today ]

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Homily by Fr. John Gilbert (visiting from Falmouth & Helston) on Saturday 12th. Vigil Mass 5pm (12:36 mins - 4.33MB MP3) >>

click to download / open 

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Palm Sunday of the Passion of the Lord: At the start of Holy Week, Jesus gloriously entered Jerusalem and was proclaimed as the promised Christ, the King of kings. Less than a week later, he was crucified. Palm Sunday gives us an opportunity to reflect, not only on the triumphal entry into Jerusalem, but also on the pains, suffering and death that the Lord underwent on our behalf. As you prepare to enter into the events of Holy Week, take time to reflect personally on the love of Jesus who endured so much for you. To help in this, here is a list of the pains, sufferings and disgrace that Jesus endured on account of our sins.
Lord Jesus, forgive me my sins. For me....
You were betrayed by the apostle Judas;
You had false accusations made against You;
You were condemned to death and spat upon;
You were repeatedly hit and punched;
You were whipped with scourges until your torn back bled;
You had a crown of thorns placed on Your head;
You carried the heavy cross of my sins;
You were stripped naked in front of a crowd of people;
You were mocked;
You were hit on the head with a reed;
You had large nails driven through your hands and feet;
You had lots cast for your clothing;
You were given a sponge full of vinegar to drink;
You gave up your Spirit and died on the cross;
You had your side pierced with a spear.
Lord Jesus, your Passion and death marked true divine love, paying the ransom for my salvation. With all my heart, I thank you Lord Jesus. Amen. ~ Fr. John Gilbert (Helston & Falmouth)

[ torch.op.org - Dominican Friars: homily for today ]

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Easter Sunday 27th March 2016
Gospel:
John 20:1-9 'He must rise from the dead.'
with Homily by Fr. Philip Dyson - 11am Mass (7:46 mins) >>

[ torch.op.org - Dominican Friars: homily for today ]

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Easter Sunday: Christ is risen! Such is the news that makes us rejoice today. What then are we to say of the gospel reading which the Church gives us for this day of our Lord's resurrection? We are presented with a cameo of three characters: Mary of Magdala, John and Peter. And what are they doing on this great day of exultation? Looking at a tomb. A tomb which is dark, musty and blood-stained. As we sing our alleluias at the bursting forth of new life, have our three characters met this new life? No, they most emphatically have not. Not today at least. They are gazing at an empty space. At best what they see are hints and traces. What a pattern for the Church these three are! Mary,
who misunderstands; John, who on his own lacks the boldness to enter the tomb; and Peter, who blunders in but cannot interpret what he sees. Yet, how well God weaves their weaknesses, with consummate skill, to achieve his purpose - namely faith in the rising of the Sun of suns.

Easter is a season of mystery. It is a period when we are transported out of time. It is when we know that new life has broken from the tomb even though, like John, we cannot yet see it. This Easter, much of our existence may seem still to lie in the bondage of time, with its spell of despair and decay. Yet today we can look upon it with resurrection eyes, knowing that the Lord of life is just around the corner. In the Church's liturgy we have only to wait until next Sunday when the apostles will see with their own eyes the risen Lord, victorious over death; and in a short space of time we too will be with him where there is no more death, nor pain, nor crying. What has changed?
Though we cannot see it yet, everything has change, because Christ is risen! Alleluia! ~ Fr. John Gilbert (Helston & Falmouth)

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Divine Mercy Sunday 3rd April 2016
Second Sunday of Easter
Gospel: John 20:19-31  'Eight days later, Jesus came in.' with Homily by Fr. Philip Dyson - 11am Mass (13:51 mins) >>

[ torch.op.org - Dominican Friars: homily for today ]

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Homily by Fr. John Gilbert (visiting from Falmouth & Helston) for Saturday 2nd April, Vigil Mass 5pm (10:36 mins) >>

click to download / open 3.64MB MP3 

Jesus said to Thomas, “You believe because you can see me. Happy are those who have not seen and yet believe.” We can take tremendous comfort from these words. Having seen how the disciples who had been gripped and paralysed by fear were suddenly “filled with joy”, we then read that the joy will be even greater for those who have never seen the Lord, and yet still believe in him and his promises: “Happy are those who have not seen and yet believe.”
The important word here is that last one, ‘believe’. The minute belief is even tinged with doubt, the fear that is lurking and waiting to find a way in sees its chance, and so the creeping paralysis of fear can find its way into our lives. If it is allied to doubt, it is not long before we find ourselves in a similar position to those frightened disciples hiding behind closed doors, unable to face the world or to do anything constructive. In a sense we have to be even stronger than they were, because we have not actually seen the Lord Jesus 'in the flesh'; but we hold on nevertheless with a tenacious grip to his words and his promises, and allow his love to flood into our lives - the love which has the power to drive out fear, and give us the strength and ability to work as his disciples in the world of today. “Happy are those who have not seen and yet believe.” ~ Fr. John Gilbert (Helston & Falmouth)

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find other homilies, sermons and commentaries via external links below | see 2012-13 for previous year C

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Vatican links
include Zenit Rome | for more from the Pope see also Homilies from Pope Francis (Vatican website) - L'Osservatore Romano - Vatican Radio - Vatican information service - Catholic News Agency - read Pope Francis on Twitter
other resources: Dominican Friars torch website | blog & sermons from Fr. Dylan James | "Sunday Gospels" from Clifton Diocese |"Wednesday Word" Sunday Gospel reflections (Lectio Divina) | weekly reflections from CAFOD | Daily Scripture readings and meditations from rc.net

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